No posts with your specified tag(s) were found.

September 17, 2019

0 Comments

Friday’s Global Climate Strike

global climate strike

Activists are gearing up for the world-wide climate strike scheduled for Friday, September 20th, and they’re summoning leaders to play their role — faith leaders included.

Millions are being urged to walk off their jobs and out of their classrooms in anticipation of the United Nations Climate Action Summit on September 23. The idea was inspired by a 16-year-old Swedish student, Greta Thunberg, who began skipping her Friday classes so she could protest outside her nation’s parliament in Stockholm. She’s slated to lead a demonstration in New York City’s Foley Square on that day.

Naturally, news of this event has swept the internet. The Global Climate Strike website features a searchable map for events throughout the world, and there’s a “Toolkit” for faith leaders with savvy social media advice, a checklist, an outreach template, a church leader sign up sheet, and proposals for sermons and testimonies.

Also naturally, the scheduled protests have spawned controversy. One curious criticism comes from Professor Pete Dobson, a 76-year-old climate scientist who is developing technology to reduce greenhouse emissions. He fears a work-hampering city-wide shut down: “If the planned strike does cause disruption, it will destroy the chance of some of our team getting investment to tackle global climate issues. One of our investors who is supporting us to develop carbon emission-elimination technology may now call off a visit to Oxford on Friday. We will lose at least a few million pounds that could have gone towards saving the planet.”

How about rescheduling the meeting, professor?

A more serious concern involves the tone of some of the protest calls: Elders should “finally” join the kids and get involved. First, that’s misleading and gives the impression that anyone bearing the non-millennial tag has been a slouch. In fact, many environmental leaders sprout gray hair and have been at it for decades. Second, anointing kids as the leaders may convey that climate change isn’t serious, so let the young ‘uns handle it.

Wrong. Climate change is the most important material issue facing civilization, and it’s all hands on deck. Teens, college students, mothers, fathers, grandmothers and grandfathers should be out there on Friday — and pastors can urge their flocks to get beyond their church walls.

Advertisements
Continue reading...

September 13, 2019

0 Comments

CEOs to Senate: Enact Gun Laws

AR15

Once again, advocacy for gun regulation has popped up like a whack-a-mole, far from lefty terrain. Before, it sprang from Catholic pro-lifers. Yesterday, it emerged in a letter to US senators from 145 powerful CEOs, with the chiefs of Uber, Lyft, Levi Strauss, Gap, Dick’s Sporting Goods, and Beyond Meat supplying their names.

Their logic appealed to America’s pragmatic side and painted with a different brush than the morality-driven Catholic pro-lifers. Compare their letter with Jesuit Father James Martin, who said this: “Those who consider themselves religious or pro-life must be invited to see that the desire to prevent gun-related deaths is part of the religious defense of the dignity of all life.” He was echoed by Christopher Hale and the US Catholic bishops.

The business people were all business: “As leaders of some of America’s most respected companies and those with significant business interests in the United States, we are writing to you because we have a responsibility and obligation to stand up for the safety of our employees, customers and all Americans communities we serve across the country. Doing nothing about America’s gun violence is simply unacceptable and it is time to stand with the American public on gun safety.”

The entire letter can be found here.

This isn’t the first time company leaders have seen their civic responsibility. In 2017, many objected to President Trump’s rollback of Obama-era environmental and climate change regulations, reasoning that droughts, floods, rising seas, and mammoth storms were bad for the bottom line. They’re not totally a-moral — some may have signed statements emanating from their churches, synagogues, temples, or mosques — but their pragmatism underscores an ultimate reality: Practical concerns and moral verities eventually meet. To put it another way, it’s unprofitable to be immoral.

Follow the link. Read the letter. It opens up another avenue by which we might save lives.

 

 

Continue reading...

September 12, 2019

0 Comments

Facebook’s anti-freedom complicity

Facebook, it seems, was complicit in national sabotage.

Rate this:

Continue reading...

September 11, 2019

0 Comments

Memories of 9-11: Struggling through vengeful longings

There it was: a colossal plume engulfed the Manhattan skyline.  The absent towers rendered the landscape eerily naked. 

Rate this:

Continue reading...

September 9, 2019

0 Comments

The Intelligentsia needs smarts

The American intellectual elite fails to feel America’s pulse.

Rate this:

Continue reading...

September 6, 2019

0 Comments

Immigration follow-up

Reagan called America to remember the source of its greatness in his final speech as president: The immigrant.

Rate this:

Continue reading...

August 27, 2019

0 Comments

Remaining Sanguine In A World of Rage

The question of the hour: How do we stay focused in the era of trolls and beat-red faces?

Rate this:

Continue reading...

August 19, 2019

0 Comments

The Face of Anger v. The Face of Grace: A Biblical View of Immigration

The present-day hostility toward immigration is a symptom of a larger illness: Anger is overtaking grace

Rate this:

Continue reading...

July 22, 2019

0 Comments

“Millennial” Is Not A Thing

Experts frown on our generational classifications because they’re not sociological categories

Rate this:

Continue reading...

July 15, 2019

0 Comments

A Correction

I’m writing this so e-mail subscribers will get it. Yesterday, I said Congresswomen Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, Alexandria Ocasio Cortez of New York, and Ilhan Omar of Minnesota were all born in the United States. While that’s true of the first three, Omar was born in Somalia in 1982, spent four […]

Rate this:

Continue reading...